Latest Book in Blue Thread Saga

Seven Stitches

Portland, Oregon, 2059. It’s been a year since The Big One–the Cascadia subduction zone earthquake–hit the city and devastated the Oregon coast. Meryem Einhorn Zarfati is still struggling to put her life back together when she’s called upon to save a young girl enslaved in sixteenth century Istanbul. Seven Stitches joins The Ninth Day and Blue Thread in the Blue Thread Saga.

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Ruth's Blog: The Interlace Place

Today I offer a lesson in irony.

If you’re reading this post you likely know that Seven Stitches is the latest companion novel in the Blue Thread Saga. Ooligan Press has teamed up with Another Read Through for the official launch on February 16 at 7. This book pairs the past (16th century Istanbul) with the future (Portland, Oregon, in 2059).

How did I decide about what will have changed by 2059? That’s for another post. One aspect of 2059, though, is that Facebook is gone, gone, gone. Here’s a snip from the book:

Mr. Utopia was back to his regular banter a few minutes later, waxing nostalgic with Rose about cane sugar tasting better than the beet sugar we often used. As he inhaled fried tempeh, Rose told him about the sugar beet trains in Russia and about her mother’s recipe for borscht. Then, to my surprise, she told him about coming to the States. […]

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If the Hanukkah story reminds us of the power of resistance, then Russell Freedman’s We Will Not Be Silent fits with the #Readukkah! spirit of the Association of Jewish Libraries and with perhaps our own thoughts this season. This nonfiction book nominally for older children (but with a topic suited for teens and adults) follows the White Rose student resistance movement in Nazi Germany from its rise through the execution of its leaders shortly before the fall of the Third Reich.

The “we” in We Will Not Be Silent began with a handful of high school and college students, led in part by Hans Scholl and his sister Sophie, both former members of the Hitler youth movement. They and others wrote, mimeographed, and distributed leaflets denouncing their nation’s treatment of Jewish citizens and other “undesirables.”

The leaflets soon flooded all parts of Germany and called for the overthrow of the Nazi regime. […]

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